Blog | Methods

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29. March 2024

Mapping as a Research Tool: How to Empirically Grasp the Refiguration of Spaces?

Dr. Carolin Genz | Sophie Krone | Dr. Séverine Marguin

By creating maps, researchers can gain insights into the social and cultural dimensions of urban, rural, hybrid, and mediated landscapes. Mapping can also be used to analyze historical changes, and to monitor ongoing changes and future developments. The objective of our workshop was to create space for transfer and exchange, especially about the interdisciplinary experience and body of knowledge produced in the first phase of the CRC. The different disciplinary backgrounds of the speakers demonstrate the transdisciplinary potential of mapping methods for the research of socio-spatial phenomena.

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23. February 2024

Waterbodies: flows, space, and other stuff

Afra Foli

What is your favorite waterbody? What do you like about it? Chances are that you thought of a lake or a river, maybe even an entire ocean. For the collaborative workshop at the CRC 1265 on ‘water, flows, space, and other stuff’, Moritz Kasper and Afra Foli decided to use the notion of ‘waterbody’ to talk about slightly unorthodox containers of water: an urban river-turned-drain in Accra and bright yellow jerry cans in Nairobi.

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20. October 2023

Travelogue to the Edinburgh Botanic Garden

Seminar “Nature, Space and Biopolitics: Understanding the Conservation Regime in Planetary Urbanism” (Summer Semester 2023, TU Berlin)

Within the framework of the project seminar “Nature, Space and Biopolitics: Understanding the Conservation Regime in Planetary Urbanism,” we spent the last year investigating the refiguration of the modern institutions […]

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29. September 2023

Puzzling Spaces and Theoretical Puzzles: Working with Spatial Figures in Project C07

Christina Hecht | Prof. Dr. Stefan Kirchner

Working in the CRC challenges us to translate the broad framework of spatial theory into our empirical work. In this blogpost, we illustrate how we handle this challenge in our project.

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10. March 2023

Visualizing Narrative Spaces

Claudia Mock | Simone Rueß

On the 22nd of November, 2022, Claudia Mock from the Methods-Lab of the CRC 1265 organized the hybrid lecture and workshop “Visualizing Narrative Spaces” with the visual artist Simone Rueß, who shared insights into her work, which deals with the inscription of politics into urban structures, home-making practices and memory processes within biographical narrations, contextualized through drawings, animations, objects and installations. In this blog post, Simone Rueß reflects on the hybrid workshop, which was conceived as a performative narrative in which diverse participants from various disciplines developed individual visual approaches in a collective action.

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7. September 2022

A Visual Experiment at the CRC

Dr. Séverine Marguin | Dr. David Joschua Schröder

The CRC 1265 is currently experimenting with visual methods of analysis. This blogpost presents one such experiment. In this experiment, preliminary research findings were transformed into graphics by a designer, thus setting in motion an image-based process of discovery and reflection. It is shown how such a short-term collaboration between social science and artistic design has been carried out and what kind of potential it brought with it.

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6. August 2022

“It is not possible to study space without exchanging ideas” — An Interview with CRC 1265 guest researcher Olena Kononenko on her life and research in Kyjiw and Berlin

Olena Kononenko

Olena Kononenko has been a guest researcher at the CRC 1265 since mid-May 2022. With Lucie Bernroider and Sarah Etz, she spoke about Kyjiw’s past, present and future, similarities and differences between Kyjiw and Berlin, her experiences at the CRC 1265 and her hopes for future returns – to both Kyjiw and Berlin.

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2. April 2021

Neighbourly negotiations

Aline Schütze | Franziska Bittner

Idealised values of common identification and consensus often attributed to urban neighbourhoods are romanticised, transfiguring and problematic. The socio-spatial construct of the neighbourhood is constituted not only by what we have in common and what we share, but also by dissent and conflict. We argue that conflict is not to be seen as deficient but can rather be constitutive and, in some cases, even productive for the socio-spatial (re)production of urban neighbourhoods. A research design that combines theory on social negotiations, rules and conventions in the public sphere with critical mapping techniques based on workshops conducted in the field helps to analyse the ambivalent role of conflicts in Berlin-Neukölln.

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